Sunday, October 3, 2010

Marshmallow Herb: Our slimy and sweet medicine




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to learn about Marshmallow Herb.






18 comments:

jim mcdonald said...

learnt from Howie Brounstein:

Demulcents can also act as drying agents, like astringents. If you take or apply the herb in a not fully hydrated state, it will absorb moisture from tissues, or a wound.

So, if you were to think about a oozey ulceration, you'd not want to put hydrated marshmallow mucilage on it (too damp), but if you put dry marshmallow root powder on it, it will absorb the dampness and dry out the wound.

I saw this work really good with a powder of marshmallow and goldenseal (3:1) on an infected oozey ulceration that didn't want to respond to any other treatment.

Nice.

Rosalee de la Foret said...

Very interesting. Thanks jim (and Howie).

Sarah said...

Thanks Rosalee. I'm always loathe to harvest my marshmallow roots, but make oil every year from the leaves and used them last year or an effective cough syrup. Now I shall start experimenting with a leaf tea.

Marqueta (Mar-keet-a) said...

Dear Rosalee,

Wonderful stuff! I have a whole yard full of mallow, which is calling out to be harvested :).

Love,

Marqueta

Howie Brounstein said...

Many folks consider marshmallow to be a "mellow" herb; however, I have had a number of clients avoid emergency room visits with thick slimy marshmallow tea! BTW Jim, thanks for the footnote references to me

Eden said...

Thanks for this post. It is a wonderful skin and hair treatment for even normal skin. Use it in lotions, herbal hair rinses and soaps for softening and detangling. Works well in preparations for all hair types, including curly or wavy, as well as natural black hair. Externally it is also safe for babies.

Tanya said...

Hi Rosalee

Interesting post. You say that all parts of the mallow can be infused in oil. Well I am interested in making an infused oil using: (1) the marshmallow root and (2)the malva sylvestris flowers, but I would like to know whether it is possible to infuse using the dried versions and whether I should use the stove method or the sun method.

Your input on this matter would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I would use dried mallow in a cold oil infusion. Let me know what works for you!

Naturally Mindful said...

How long should the cold oil be infused for and at what ratio? I came to your post doing a google search and no one seems to have info or oil infused with marshmallow for external oil, so I'd super appreciate any input! :)

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I'd infuse fro 4-6 weeks at a 1:5 dried root ratio.

txagsw said...

Rosalee, how would you use and at what ratio would you use the leaves and flowers? Cold infusion?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I generally use a hot infusion for the leaves and flowers. That would be a nice thing to try out though - make one cold and one hot and see the difference.

For the leaves you could fill a pint jar 1/4 full with leaves and then fill with the hot water. Let it steep for 20-30 minutes. Then strain.

I use the leaves a lot in tea blends where I want a mucilaginous quality but want to use aerial portions (because of weight issues or shorter steeping time).

km klersy said...

Hi -I have a recipe that called for marshmallow root powder and I mistakenly bought just marchmallow root instead. Would it work to send it for a spin thru my nutribullet with the grinder blade to turn it into a powder form?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

Marshmallow roots aren't that hard so a nutribullet should get it to powdered form. Good luck.

Sue said...

What parts of the plant do you use for acid reflux? Thank you.

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

The roots are commonly used. The leaves could work as well.

Kerri said...

Hello! I have marshmallow root powder, but I have recipes calling for the dried form. Would I use a smaller amount of the powder like I would do with fresh herbs vs dried?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I guess that would depend on your recipe and what you are making...?