Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Astragalus: A Supreme Protector


This page has moved. 
Please go to http://www.herbalremediesadvice.org/astragalus-health-benefits.html
to read about Astragalus Health Benefits.


27 comments:

Michael Blackmore said...

I definitely appreciate astragulus but I think the immune support aspects (like with all herbs) can be taken the wrong way. I had a consultation with someone who just wanted astragulus because they got sick a lot. But their real underlying issue was poor nutrition but they wanted the quick fix rather than the lifestyle change they really needed. Not that it isn't useful, but sometimes herbalists can get really excited in ways that can play into herbs as fix up pills instead of part of the real healing necessary.

But I babble...

Alaska Native said...

Excellent and thorough post, complete with caveats and citations. I learned more about astragalus today, especially from a TCM perspective. Didn't realize that a tincture form may not provide an effective dose, at least without consuming a bit more alcohol than desired, perhaps. I will try using the powdered form in morning porridge and bread recipes now. Thank you!

We will succeed said...

Good afternoon. Is there a way to use Astragalus powder other than adding it to soups (Which I have begun doing)? I bought it from MRH before really knowing I'd prefer the root so that I can make tisanes and tinctures... I'd like to use what I have before buying more (in root form).

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

You can add the powder to all sorts of things, smoothies, yogurt, applesauce, etc. You can even mix it with nut butters like this recipe: http://www.herbmentor.com/20091204_2/

We will succeed said...

Thank you.

*Goddess* said...

Rosalee, how many milligrams (capsule)should a person take when starting astragalus?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I generally recommend this in large dosages, starting around 10 grams.

*Goddess* said...

Thanks, Rosalee!

Shaena Mallett said...

This is so informative and helpful. Thank you!!

blessings.

Fafa Potgieter said...

Making the tea with the root, how much root to how much water should I being using and how much of the tea do I drink per day? Thank you !

raya said...

I recently purchased astralagus powder in bulk from a reputable herb source and it is very green unlike the photos shown on your site. I do not know which part of the plant was used to prepare this powder. Can you comment on this please? Thanks.

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

Hi Fafa,
The dose for Astragalus is anywhere between 10-100 grams. I tend to use more around 20-30 grams. The amount of water you use doesn't matter. The dose is in the herb. You basically want enough water that you have something to simmer in for awhile but not so much water that you are having to drink a gallon a day.

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

Hi Raya,

Astragalus root should definitely not be green. I would contact the supplier to find out what is going on.

Nurturing Life said...

I used the Astragalus Root in the following recipe for making an Elderberry Syrup:
3 oz dried elderberries
1/4 oz astragalus root
1/8 oz ginger root
1/8 oz cinnamon chips
4 cups water
Bring to a boil.
Reduce heat, Cover pot and simmer for 2-4 hours. (I did 4 hours)
If it reduces to less than 2 cups, add more water.
After Simmering- Keep lid on, allow to cool for 30 minutes or so.
Strain and squeeze through a cheesecloth thoroughly.
Add 1 cup of honey to the syrup (I used buckwheat honey)
Bottle and Refrigerate

This is a recipe given to me by another herbalist. My purpose for using it is for an immune booster throughout the cold and flu season, on and off for a few days at a time. Or also at the first sign of a cold, begin using it a few times per day, 1-2 tablespoons until the cold or flu is gone.

What is your opinion of this recipe and our purpose for using it?

Our family is generally healthy, eats well, gets regular exercise, and my husband and I recently quit smoking for the last time! Our daughter is 6 and also is a wonderful eater. Our daughter is struggling with Candida, although we have made huge progress recently though diet, probiotics, and natural bath and beauty practices. Other than that, there are no other on going health issues in the family.

Thank you for your opinion!

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

Looks like a nice recipe to me. As far as the astragalus goes that is a very small amount. I generally use more than 1/4 ounce for a single dose during the day.

Unknown said...

Do you have any ideas for making a healing salve with astragalus? In Chinese medicine school, we learned that huang qi is an excellent topical for flesh regeneration (i.e. scrapes, burned or chapped skin), but that unfortunately the active properties are not soluble in oil. That means that poultices or soaks can be used, but there isn't an easy way to incorporate it effectively into an easier to apply salve or balm. Anyone happen to have any ideas? Could a tincture somehow be added to a salve preparation?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

Tinctures can be added to salves. They can also be added as the water portion of creams. I've never done that using astragalus, but it can certainly be done. If you try it let me know how it goes.

Nicole Larson said...

Rosalee, I so appreciate the time you take to write these blogs and share your knowledge. I often look to your articles and research when I am wanting to learn more about certain herbs and body functions. I love how you incorporate the best of all medicines and clearly express it in a way that is easy to understand and utilize in every day life. This is one of the best monographs on Astragulus that I have seen, thank you.

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

You made my day Nicole, thank you!

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I've been thinking about Astragalus being used for wounds and from a chemical constituent perspective that makes a lot of sense. Astragalus is high in polysaccharides which have been shown to increase cell proliferation.

Polysaccharides are best extracted with water and not alcohol or oil. That's not to say an oil or alcohol extract of astragalus wouldn't work (herbs don't read books as Henriette Kress says), but that would be the strictly constituent perspective on it from a polysaccharide point of view.

mika said...

Rosalee,

Thanks for that further info! You are wonderful!

Regarding your thoughts, that goes in line with what my teacher explained as well. So...how can we get the polysaccharides into something that is easy to apply? Perhaps only a spray would work?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I'm not sure. Medicinal extracts are not really my specialty. It is hard to make water based preparations convenient.

Comfrey is another powerful vulnerary herb high in polysaccharides. My favorite way to use that is as a poultice.

Newbie said...

I am very new to the herbal world. I was wondering is there a book of comprehensive information on herbs and they're uses? Conventional medicine has really failed my family in the past year, but after trying some of the natural remedies we have seen awesome improvements. I loved your post and figured I would ask. Thanks.

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

There are so many different herb books on so many different topics that it's hard to choose even a handful for you. I do have a listing of all of my favorite herbal books along with short descriptions here: http://www.methowvalleyherbs.com/p/books-for-herbalists.html

hope that helps!

Newbie said...

Thank you.

Madlena Davtyan said...

Does it work good for boils?

Rosalee de la Forêt said...

I don't think of astragalus for boils. Generally with boils you want something cooling and eliminating. Echinacea is a favorite of mine for boils.